news.com.au | Sydney bars serving up flavoured whiskey

Sydney bars serving up flavoured whiskey

Flavoured whiskey is on the rise, tasting of everything from peppermint to orange to chocolate.

Renata Gortan | The Daily Telegraph | FEBRUARY 11, 20181:38PM

Whiskey aficionados may scoff into their peat-smoked malt and rye blends, but flavoured whiskey is on the rise.

The latest trend from the US involves spiking the dark stuff with everything from peppermint to orange to chocolate.

Nola Smokehouse and Bar at Barangaroo is leading the charge by introducing flavoured whiskey flights.

Raven Benoit and Alicia Hawkins at Nola, Barangaroo, enjoying a flavoured whisky flight. Picture: Justin Lloyd.

Raven Benoit and Alicia Hawkins at Nola, Barangaroo, enjoying a flavoured whisky flight. Picture: Justin Lloyd.Source:News Corp Australia

 

Co-owner Pete Fischer said flavoured whiskeys aren’t dumbed down versions of the real thing.

“They are serious products using different flavour profiles,” he said.

“In the States the boutique distillery market is going gangbusters, people are distilling with sea water, beer and coffee. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

“Seven Stills in San Francisco is leading the flavoured market at the moment. They distil straight from beer and its Chocasmoke is distilled from chocolate oatmeal stout. It is amazing.”

It’s one of the whiskeys on offer at as part of the flavoured tasting paddles. Another is the Pow-Wow Botanical Rye Whiskey that takes inspiration from gin and uses the botanical notes of saffron and orange to lend a note of astringency to the 45 per cent proof spirit.

Glenn Wheeler serves Alicia Hawkins a paddle of flavoured whiskeys at Nola, Barangaroo. Picture: Justin Lloyd.

Glenn Wheeler serves Alicia Hawkins a paddle of flavoured whiskeys at Nola, Barangaroo. Picture: Justin Lloyd.Source:News Corp Australia

 

Fischer said flavoured whiskeys are a great way to introduce people to the spirit.

“The alcohol is offset by sweetness, so it doesn’t hit you as hard, but they’re not super sweet flavours,” he said.

“Seasoned whisky drinker will still be able to identify the grass roots whiskey and how they introduce other flavours while still keeping to the core of what makes an American whiskey.”

The off-premise market for flavoured whiskey is also growing. Maker’s Mark Mint Julep has hints of mint and sugar while Johnnie Walker Blenders’ Batch series of experimental whiskies released this month include Espresso Roast, with coffee and chocolate notes.

Originally published as Sweet flavours transform whiskey

Read the full article on news.com.au

2018-07-06T17:39:46+00:00